Bookmark this Site: Song Catchers’ Library

colorful-music-notes-in-a-line-colorful-notesNeed a storytime song about pizza? Looking for some new songs to use with shakers or scarves? Want to find some music to support your STEM programming?  Look no further than Song Catchers’ Library, a handy database of music for children’s programming compiled by Heather of littleliteracylibrarian.org and Kelsey of librarybonanza.com.  With an ever-growing, searchable database of song references and handy tabs that compile some of the most commonly searched items such as seasons, action songs, and prop songs, this is a site anyone who uses music with children will love.  Don’t see a favorite song listed?  Just fill out the form on the homepage – Heather and Kelsey are adding to the database every day.

Rescheduled Webinar: You Have a Great Idea! Now Get it Published!

Due to inclement weather, the webinar below was rescheduled. (Yes, we realize that this is ironic, but did you really want to try to attend a webinar while dealing with your kids being off school?) This means that you have another chance to sign up! Are you a library staff person who wants to write articles or books? Then check out this online workshop:

You Have a Great Idea! Now Get it Published!

Thursday, March 5, 2015 from 2—3 pm

Platform: Blackboard

Do you want to write a book or article but don’t know where to start? In this 1-hour webinar, three published authors of resource books and articles for children’s librarians will share the ins and outs of getting published in journals such as School Library Journal and with publishers such as ALA Editions and Libraries Unlimited. Learn about the publishing opportunities that are out there for you, what you’ll need to include in your proposal, and how to get from idea to proposal. Join us and jumpstart your publishing career!

Presenters:

Betsy Diamant-Cohen of Mother Goose on the Loose

Julie Dietzel-Glair, author of Books in Motion

Kathy MacMillan, author of Storytime Magic and other storytime resource books

 

Registration info: http://www.mdlib.org/calendar_day.asp?date=3/5/2015&event=48

MLA members $15, non members $23, students $13

1 contact hour awarded

NOTE: If you registered for the cancelled Feb. 17 session, you’re still on the list. If you registered for Feb. 17 and can’t attend on March 5, please contact kmonagan@mdlib.org

 

 

Basic American Sign Language for Library Staff eCourse

macmillan_300Instructor: Kathy MacMillan, NIC, M.L.S.

Asynchronous eCourse beginning March 2, 2015 and continuing for 6 weeks

(Participants will have 12 weeks to complete course material)

$195.00

Click here to register.

Estimated Hours of Learning: 30

Certificate of Completion available upon request

 

American Sign Language (ASL) is an invaluable skill for library professionals. A basic grasp of ASL enhances your ability to serve deaf library users and opens up a new world of possibilities for storytime programs. It’s also a marketable professional skill that can translate to public service jobs beyond the library world.

Ideal for those without previous experience, this eCourse taught by librarian and ASL interpreter Kathy MacMillan will use readings, multimedia resources, and online discussion boards to introduce basic ASL vocabulary and grammar appropriate for use in a library setting. MacMillan will place ASL within a linguistic and cultural context, aiding participants in improving library services.

After completing this eCourse, participants will:

  • Know and be able to use approximately 20-30 signs
  • Have a basic understanding of Deaf culture and how to interact effectively with deaf patrons
  • Understand multiple applications of ASL in different library contexts
  • Understand how the library can use ASL as a service that ties into the broader community

Comments from past participants:

“This course has been invaluable to me. I have spent countless hours reviewing all of the video, re-reading the lessons, and just generally trying to absorb as much knowledge as I could. The instructor was a gem in the way that she provided comprehensive answers to questions, feedback, tips and resources.”

“While I had taken ASL many years ago, this class has expanded my vocabulary and boosted my confidence in my abilities. I think it helped that this class specifically addressed situations I might encounter here at work.”

“This has been a great introduction to both the language and the culture!”

“This class was interesting, informative, and entertaining. It opened my eyes to a variety of ideas and concepts that can only make me a better librarian as well as a better person. I thought things were well organized and presented in an ordered and logical fashion, each lesson building on the one before.”

Become a Programming Blogger!

The Public Programs Office of the American Library Association has announced that it is preparing to re-launch its ProgrammingLibrarian.org website and is looking for bloggers!

Bloggers will be asked to write at least one post per month on a programming-related topic. You will write the article, upload it onto the site, preferably with a photo, and ALA will lightly edit it. Post length can vary but 300-500 words is a good estimate.

If you are interested in applying, please send the following to Andriana Bozovic (abozovic@ala.org) by Feb. 27:

  • A brief description of your library experience and your interests
  • A description of any prior writing experience
  • A general theme for your blog (eg, I’m a public librarian blogging on children’s programming) and three sample blog topics/headlines that you might write about
  • Attach an informal writing sample (eg, blog post, newsletter article, etc — something that shows your voice)

Seeking a variety of voices — public libraries, academic, school, special; people interested in community-building, tech programming, children’s program, older adult programming; etc. So think about what interests you.

Read Captions Across America on March 2

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You’ve probably heard of Read Across America, the national reading event sponsored by the National Education Association every year on or near March 2, the birthday of Dr. Seuss.

But did you know that this is also the day we celebrate Read Captions Across America?  This event, sponsored by the Described and Captioned Media Program, was established to “raise awareness—particularly among children and their parents and teachers—that video-based media can be just as effective at encouraging and fostering reading skills as books, as long as captions are always turned on!”

Read Captions Across America emphasizes captions as a reading tool for ALL children, not just thoise who are deaf or hard-of-hearing.  Libraries and schools can promote the necessity of captions for accessibility and enhancing reading skills by incorporating Read Captions Across America programming any time of the year.  Click here to order event kits and download free materials for your own celebration!

 

 

 

Boogie with Books

logoheaderbestWe just became aware of the great “Book to Boogie” series on the Library as Incubator Project blog, which pairs great storytime books with dance and movement activities in monthly themed guest posts.  This month’s entry features books about the sea, with accompanying activities by Julie Dietzel-Glair, author of the great storytime resource Books in Motion.  Check out Julie’s post and the whole series for more idea to put some motion in your storytimes or lessons!

Inspiration, Book Reviews, and a Side of Crafts

Picture1Looking for more new ideas to spice up your storytime or classroom?  We’ve become big fans of the blog, Read It Again, Mom!  Maintained by “A Librarian Mom and Her Kids”, this site is filled with book reviews, storytime ideas, crafts, and fun links to bring our favorite kind of hands-on fun to book programs.   In the aftermath of the holidays, be sure to check out this post on things you can make from wrapping paper roll and this super-cute penguin storytime perfect for the wintry days ahead!

10 Great Picture Books About ASL and Deaf Culture

December 3-10 is Clerc-Gallaudet Week, honoring the birthdays of two visionary leaders in the field of American Deaf Education who were born in December: Laurent Clerc on December 26, 1785 and Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet on December 10, 1787. Check out this previous post for more information about Clerc and Gallaudet, including program and lesson ideas.

Today we are honoring Clerc-Gallaudet week by sharing our 10 favorite picture books/series about American Sign Language and Deaf Culture:

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Creating a Diverse Book Collection

From Lee & Low Books’ blog, The Open Book:

“It’s not easy to create an inclusive book collection. Whether you’re a librarian creating a collection for an entire community, a teacher creating a collection for your classroom, or a parent creating a collection for your children, choosing books that reflect the diversity of human experience can be a challenging job.

That’s because creating a diverse book collection is about more than just making sure X, Y, and Z are represented. It’s not a matter of ticking off check boxes or making sure quotas are filled. For those committed to doing it right, building a diverse book collection requires contemplation, research, and awareness. But the rewards are great: a truly diverse collection of books can turn children into lifelong readers and promote empathy, understanding, and self-confidence.”

Check out the rest of this great post for actionable steps to creating real diversity in your collection: Checklist: 8 Steps to Creating a Diverse Book Collection.

Happy Picture Book Month!

PBMBADGE-AMBASSADORNovember is Picture Book Month! This international literacy initiative, founded by author and storyteller Dianne de Las Casas, celebrates the print picture book during the month of November. Check out the Picture Book Month website, which features daily posts from “picture book champions” and has lots of great classroom and storytime resources!

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