Category Archives: Books in Storytime

Night Owl Flannelboard and Sound Story

Another sneak peek from our newest book, More Storytime Magic (ALA Editions, January 2016):

Night Owl Flannelboard and Sound Story

Based on the book by Toni Yuly (New York: Macmillan, 2015).night owl

Night Owl listens to the sounds of the night, waiting for his very favorite one: his mother returning home! As you tell the story, play clips of the sounds that Night Owl hears and ask the children to identify them.

Download full-size printable illustrations by Melanie Fitz.

Click on the links below for sounds:

Owl Hoot

Woodpecker

Train whistle

Cricket

Toad

Thunderstorm

Owl Hoot

MacMillan_cover_1p.inddFind lots more great storytime activities in More Storytime Magic, the latest volume in the Storytime Magic series!

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Wonderful Wordless Picture Books

Over at StoriesByHand.com, Kathy’s sharing a wonderful article by early childhood educator Louise Rollins of Maryland/DC Hands & Voices. Though the article specifically addresses techniques for using wordless picture books with deaf and hard of hearing children, these ideas will benefit hearing children as well.  here’s a snippet:

Wordless picture books are excellent for helping your child understand the sequence of events in the story. During book sharing with a traditional book, a child sees part of the story in the picture and perhaps understands part of the story through the text that is read to her, then has to piece together a narrative from those two fractured elements, filling in the blanks on her own as she is able. Using a wordless picture book, your child can understand the events through the picture first, then learn from you the language that describes what she sees. This process helps develop your child’s story comprehension and build her vocabulary.

IMG_2946Because the pictures may be open to some interpretation, wordless picture books create an interactive reading experience where you and your child can discuss what you think is happening in the story. You can encourage your child to take on the role of narrator; even if your child cannot read print yet he can “read” these books independently or to you. Storytelling opportunities help your child practice organizing his thoughts, including sufficient information for his audience, and selecting relevant details. In other words, while practicing reading, your child is also practicing important writing skills, without even picking up a pencil.

When you read wordless picture books, you can modify your storytelling to use single words or shorter phrases. You might want to do this if your child does not yet understand longer strings of connected language, or is still developing his attention span. If you are learning to sign, you do not have to feel bound by the print and feel pressure if you don’t know every sign in the text. If you are learning to cue, you do not have to worry about cueing long passages at one time. Instead, you can focus on telling the story and enjoying book sharing with your child.

Read the entire article here.

More Wordless Picture Book Resources:

Louise Rollins’ Recommended Picture Books: Look for “wordless” in the book descriptions to narrow down your search.

Early Literacy Storytime: Wordless Books at Mel’s Desk

Sharing Wordless Picture Books from Reading Rockets (printable handout for parents)

Top 10 Wordless Picture Books from Children’s Books Guide

Why Wordless Books?: Article about sharing wordless books in the classroom by Leslie Ross-Degnan , M.Ed., and Christina Silvi, M.A at Earlychildhood News

Wonderful Wordless Picture Books at Storytime Standouts

 

 

 

 

10 Great Picture Books About ASL and Deaf Culture

December 3-10 is Clerc-Gallaudet Week, honoring the birthdays of two visionary leaders in the field of American Deaf Education who were born in December: Laurent Clerc on December 26, 1785 and Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet on December 10, 1787. Check out this previous post for more information about Clerc and Gallaudet, including program and lesson ideas.

Today we are honoring Clerc-Gallaudet week by sharing our 10 favorite picture books/series about American Sign Language and Deaf Culture:

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Creating a Diverse Book Collection

From Lee & Low Books’ blog, The Open Book:

“It’s not easy to create an inclusive book collection. Whether you’re a librarian creating a collection for an entire community, a teacher creating a collection for your classroom, or a parent creating a collection for your children, choosing books that reflect the diversity of human experience can be a challenging job.

That’s because creating a diverse book collection is about more than just making sure X, Y, and Z are represented. It’s not a matter of ticking off check boxes or making sure quotas are filled. For those committed to doing it right, building a diverse book collection requires contemplation, research, and awareness. But the rewards are great: a truly diverse collection of books can turn children into lifelong readers and promote empathy, understanding, and self-confidence.”

Check out the rest of this great post for actionable steps to creating real diversity in your collection: Checklist: 8 Steps to Creating a Diverse Book Collection.

Happy Picture Book Month!

PBMBADGE-AMBASSADORNovember is Picture Book Month! This international literacy initiative, founded by author and storyteller Dianne de Las Casas, celebrates the print picture book during the month of November. Check out the Picture Book Month website, which features daily posts from “picture book champions” and has lots of great classroom and storytime resources!

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Start to Finish Story Time Lesson Plans from Dawn Babb Prochovnic

Dawn Babb Prochovnic, author of the "Story Time with Signs and Rhymes" series.

Dawn Babb Prochovnic, author of the “Story Time with Signs and Rhymes” series.

Last week, Kathy’s “Stories By Hand” blog featured an interview with Dawn Babb Prochovnic, author of the “Story Time with Signs and Rhymes” series.  Click here for the interview.

We were so excited to learn that Dawn has a great series of “Start to Finish Story Time” posts on her blog.  Each of these lesson plans centers around one of her books, and includes suggested songs, rhymes, signing games, and reading activities to use with kids, all in a modular format that allows educators and librarians to select the materials that work best for their groups.

As Dawn says, “Each lesson plan incorporates ideas that are suitable for infant/toddler, preschool and/or school age audiences, and each program incorporates activities that promote literacy/early literacy and one or more of the six keys skills recommended by the National Research Council for preparing children to become readers when they enter school. Programs can last from 20 – 45 minutes, depending on what you include and who your audience is.”

There are 4 available so far, with the promise of more to come:
A to Z, Sign with Me

Opposites

See the Colors

Wear a Silly Hat (clothing)

You may also want to bookmark this Summary Post, where Dawn will link to future installments.

op hat colors a to

Something to Celebrate Every Day

cover of World Rat DayWorld Rat Day: Poems About Real Holidays You’ve Never Heard Of

by J. Patrick Lewis; illustrated by Anna Raff  (Candlewick, 2013)

Ever heard of “Dragon Appreciation Day” (January 16)?  How about “International  Cephalopod Awareness Day” ( October 8)?  Or our personal favorite, “Chocolate-Covered Anything Day” (December 16)?  Well, J. Patrick Lewis and Anna Raff have, and they’ve assembled a funny, surprising collection of poems and illustrations that pay tribute to lesser-known celebrations.  From advice from a worm in “What the Worm Knows” (for Worm Day on March 15) to the susurrating, lyrical word-pictures of “Bats” (for Bat Appreciation Day on April 17), these poems introduce a variety of poetic forms along with the silly holidays they celebrate.  These kid-friendly poems beg for classroom and programming extensions with stories, songs, and crafts, and this book would be a terrific holiday or end-of-year gift for the teacher on your list.

Share This Book: And Then It’s Spring

51hFMsVLF0L._AA160_And Then It’s Spring by Julie Fogliano. New York: Roaring Brook Press, 2012.

After a long winter, a boy and his dog decide to do something about the brown that is all around, they plant a garden! Simple text and illustrations tell this delightful story of a boy waiting for spring to arrive. The boy looks all around at the brown, plants seeds, worries about his seeds, wishes for rain, and waits. As time goes by, the illustrations show that the weather is warming, the brown is changing, until one day it’s spring!

After the winter we’ve had, we can all sympathize with the boy’s watchful waiting!

Tricky Rabbits

51gkShUMD-L._SX258_PJlook-inside-v2,TopRight,1,0_SH20_BO1,204,203,200_ Though the Easter Bunny is known for leaving candy-filled eggs, children’s literature has a tradition of rabbits who are bit more devious.  Meet the latest batch in the hilarious Buddy and the Bunnies in Don’t Play With Your Food by Bob Shea (New York: Hyperion, 2014).  Buddy the monster is set on eating the little bunnies, but each day they trick him into playing with them through a series of clever stalling tactics – offering cupcakes until he is too full, going swimming (everyone knows you can’t eat before swimming, right?), taking him to the carnival (who wants to eat after riding on spinny, whippy rides?)…and then they unleash their secret weapon: everyone knows you’re not supposed to play with your food. Shea’s wacky text and anarchic, joyful illustrations make this a boisterous storytime read. Share this book in storytimes about food, play, friends, tricksters, or just plain silliness, or pair it with Candace Fleming’s Muncha! Muncha! Muncha! (New York: Atheneum, 2002) and the Brer Rabbit tales of Joel Chandler Harris for a storytime built around trickster rabbits.

51eygTDMeQL._SX258_PJlook-inside-v2,TopRight,1,0_SH20_BO1,204,203,200_               61yLkyr3kDL._SY344_PJlook-inside-v2,TopRight,1,0_SH20_BO1,204,203,200_

Share This Book: Take Me Out to Yakyu

Cover of Take Me Out to the YakyuBaseball season is here!  Celebrate by sharing Take Me Out to the Yakyu by Aaron Meshon (New York: Atheneum, 2013).

In this winsome picture book, a little boy describes going to the stadium to watch baseball with his American pop pop, and to the dome to watch yakyu with his Japanese ji ji.  Clever split-page illustrations compare and contrast the American and Japanese experiences of getting to the game, buying souvenirs and snacks, and cheering for the team (tellingly, American fans shout “Win! Win! Win!”, while the Japanese fans chant, “Do your best!”). A glossary of story-related words in Japanese appears at the end of the book, and an author’s note gives more details about how baseball works in American and Japan.  With brief text and vibrant illustrations, this is a great read-aloud for storytimes about sports, exercise, summertime, or families around the world.