Category Archives: Professional Development

Upcoming Webinar: Liven Up Baby and Toddler Storytimes with Sign Language

Liven Up Baby and Toddler Storytimes with Sign Language
A 90-minute webinar

Thursday, March 22, 2018, 1:00pm Eastern/12:00pm Central/11:00am Mountain/10:00am Pacific

Signing with young children of any hearing ability fosters bonding, stimulates language development, and reduces frustration for caregiver and child. Learn how to use sign language in storytimes to broaden their appeal and make them more participative. In this interactive workshop, Kathy MacMillan—American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter, librarian, and storyteller—will use video examples to provide easy-to-learn signs that can be retaught and incorporated into stories, rhymes, and songs. You will be able to use the skills learned in this workshop to create programs that will help you, your staff, and parents communicate better with children.

Individual registration

Group registration

Advertisements

Recommended Early Literacy Trainers

If you’re looking to expand your organization’s training opportunities for early literacy topics, look no further than this fantastic handout compiled by Dr. Betsy Diamant-CohenSue McCleaf Nespeca, and Saroj Nadkarni Ghoting for a recent presentation at the American Library Association’s annual conference.  Betsy, Sue, and Saroj have compiled information about their favorite early literacy trainer, and invite libraries, childcare centers, and schools to find out more about these incredible trainers!

Early Literacy Trainers

trainers

 

 

Free Accessibility Training and Resources for Librarians from Project ENABLE

The name says it all:

logo

Project ENABLE is the result of an extraordinary partnership between the Center for Digital Literacy, the School of Information Studies (iSchool@Syracuse) and the Burton Blatt Institute at Syracuse University.  This project provides free online training modules designed for public, academic and school librarians to help them make their libraries truly inclusive for all users. Thanks to funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, anyone interested in creating accessibility in libraries can access these trainings, and modules can also be customized for individual or group use.

Once you sign up for a free account, you’ll take an initial assessment and then have access to five self-paced training modules, focusing on disability awareness, disability law and policy, creating an accessible library, planning inclusive programs and instruction, and assistive technology in libraries. Each module features interactive learning activities and a brief self-assessment, for a total of ten hours of instruction.  Additional resources on the site include a template and checklists for a library accessibility action plan, universal design, Americans with Disability Act compliance, and sample lesson plans for school librarians. A certificate of completion is available for those who complete the training.

With training and resources of this caliber available for free, no librarian has any excuse to plead ignorance about how to provide accessibility. Sign up for a free training account today at http://projectenable.syr.edu/

Become a Programming Blogger!

The Public Programs Office of the American Library Association has announced that it is preparing to re-launch its ProgrammingLibrarian.org website and is looking for bloggers!

Bloggers will be asked to write at least one post per month on a programming-related topic. You will write the article, upload it onto the site, preferably with a photo, and ALA will lightly edit it. Post length can vary but 300-500 words is a good estimate.

If you are interested in applying, please send the following to Andriana Bozovic (abozovic@ala.org) by Feb. 27:

  • A brief description of your library experience and your interests
  • A description of any prior writing experience
  • A general theme for your blog (eg, I’m a public librarian blogging on children’s programming) and three sample blog topics/headlines that you might write about
  • Attach an informal writing sample (eg, blog post, newsletter article, etc — something that shows your voice)

Seeking a variety of voices — public libraries, academic, school, special; people interested in community-building, tech programming, children’s program, older adult programming; etc. So think about what interests you.