Category Archives: Grandparents

Share This Book: Take Me Out to Yakyu

Cover of Take Me Out to the YakyuBaseball season is here!  Celebrate by sharing Take Me Out to the Yakyu by Aaron Meshon (New York: Atheneum, 2013).

In this winsome picture book, a little boy describes going to the stadium to watch baseball with his American pop pop, and to the dome to watch yakyu with his Japanese ji ji.  Clever split-page illustrations compare and contrast the American and Japanese experiences of getting to the game, buying souvenirs and snacks, and cheering for the team (tellingly, American fans shout “Win! Win! Win!”, while the Japanese fans chant, “Do your best!”). A glossary of story-related words in Japanese appears at the end of the book, and an author’s note gives more details about how baseball works in American and Japan.  With brief text and vibrant illustrations, this is a great read-aloud for storytimes about sports, exercise, summertime, or families around the world.

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Read this book: How to Babysit a Grandpa by Jean Reagan

babysitHow to Babysit a Grandpa by Jean Reagan.  Illustrated by Lee Wildish.  New York: Knopf, 2012.

This delightful book is one of our favorite of recent years!  A little boy offers a how-to manual for babysitting your grandpa, including everything from what to feed him for a snack (“Ice cream topped with cookies”, “Olives served in fingertips”) to what to do on a walk (“Step over sidewalk cracks”, “Look for lizards, cool rocks, and dandelion puffs”) to how to settle Grandpa down for his nap.   Wildish’s brightly colored digital illustrations combined with Reagan’s funny funny text make for a perfect storytime book.  Be sure to bring this one out for family storytimes and grandparent days – kids and adults will both be tickled by this winner.

Thanksgiving Fun

Kathy and I would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving, and to express our thanks to our followers!

In order to celebrate the season, we suggest reading I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Pie, by Alison Jackson.  New York, Dutton Children’s Books, 1997.  This wonderful circle story with rhyming text describes how the old lady devours the Thanksgiving feast and grows larger and larger until the unexpected happens!  After reading the story, try some of the following activities with your group.

Reinforce math skills with a Pie Chart.

1.  On a piece of large paper or poster board, create a simple chart with three pies listed across the top; apple, pumpkin, and chocolate.

2.  Give each child in the group a sticker and have them place the sticker in the column with their favorite pie.

3.  Touch and count the number of stickers in each column aloud with the group.  Write the total at the bottom of the column.

4.  After all the columns are counted, ask the group which was the favorite pie.  Review the number of stickers in each column with the children.

Reinforce early literacy skills by retelling the story.  Cut food pictures out of magazines or find clip art online and distribute the food pictures to the children.  As you retell the story have each child bring up their food item.

Reinforce early literacy skills by creating extensions.  Ask the children what they will have for dinner at their Thanksgiving feast.  Do they have a favorite item that they would want to keep eating?

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